Live trades add unknown to big AFL draft

Jack Lukosius is among the sought after picks for the new AFL draftThe AFL’s new X-factor of live draft trading is about to meet the richest crop of player talent in nearly two decades.
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While the live trading of draft picks could be a fizzer in Thursday night’s first round, everyone agrees this is the best group of players since the famed 2001 crop.

Luke Hodge, Luke Ball and Chris Judd led the 2001 draft, which also featured Jimmy Bartel, Nick Dal Santo, James Kelly, Steve Johnson, Sam Mitchell, Leigh Montagna, Gary Ablett and Dane Swan.

This year, it is a given that Sam Walsh, Jack Lukosius, Izak Rankine and Max King will be among the top five choices.

But for the first time, clubs can trade where they are in the draft order.

For example, there has been speculation the two Adelaide drafts might try to pry the No.1 pick from Carlton or the second selection from Gold Coast, given that Lukosius and Rankine are from SA.

Apart from live trading, another innovation is that the draft will be held over two days.

Round one – 19 selections at this stage – will be on Thursday night at Marvel Stadium and the rest of the draft will be on Friday from noon.

The speculation is that there will be no movement among the top picks, with Carlton saying repeatedly that it would take something special for them to give up the No.1 selection.

“Over the course of the two days, there will be some trading – the first night, I don’t know,” said AFL talent manager Kevin Sheehan.

“The beauty of this is the clubs may well have most of the same 60 or 70 players on their boards, but the order would be so different.

“When they see someone there that they rank (highly) … they’d be really encouraged to jump up and get that guy.

“They’ll be dumbfounded he’s still there … they’ll give a couple of choices up for him, they might even give up the second round (choice) next year if they really value that player.”

Rival clubs can also make bids for father-son or talent academy players, meaning highly-rated Sydney academy talent Nick Blakey will probably go to the Swans in the top 10 because Adelaide or Port Adelaide are likely to force their hand.

Blakey is the son of two-time North Melbourne premiership player John Blakey, now coaching director at Sydney.

Whoever goes where, Sheehan is sure that this draft will be remembered fondly.

“We’re very bullish about its potential to be Super Draft Mark Two, basically,” he said.

“We’re already reflecting on 2001, saying ‘well, can you get eight 200-gamers in the top 20 … or eight 200 gamers after choice 30?'”

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There are too many unanswered questions when it comes to coal administration in NSW

THE firstthing we can be sure of, when it comes to talk about how various NSW Government departments have administered mining titles, applications, licenses and leases, is that the processes have been less than rigorous.
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The second thing is that NSW taxpayers have probably lost untold millions of dollars because of it.

The third thing is that mining companies have been the beneficiaries.

When the department initiated a process known as the “Clearance Project” inApril, 2017 it counted 1481 mining applications lodged beforeSeptember, 2016 –with some as far back as 1998 –where NSW Government departments tasked with mining oversight had lost track of the basics of one of the most significant industries inthe state.

The department’s reliance on paper, the filing of documents in boxes, and the lack of comprehensive systems meant mines that filed renewal documents on time could and did operate for years on old conditions, because no one was checking.

It was no surprise when seniordepartment representatives, the NSW Government and Muswellbrook Shire Council discovered in July, 2017 that mining company Ridgelands Resources had a condition in its 2013 consent requiring it to pay $5 million to establish a community fund.

If you don’t have a rigorous and consistent means of filing, collating, updating and accessing information, then cases like Ridgelands will occur. The ongoing problem with Ridgelands is that it is clear some lower-ranking department employees were aware of the community fund, and the department did not comply with its own conditions to monitor the fund’s progress.

The NSW Government continues to be pressed on the Ridgelands case in the Newcastle Herald and NSW Parliament because the public has a right to know how and why that fund remained a secret for nearly five years, and how and why it was reduced to $500,000 before the council’s Supreme Court case to get what the community was entitled to. Acceptance of an enforceable undertaking rather thanprosecutingRidgelands simply adds to community concerns.

The department has advised the “Clearance Project” ended in March, 2018 with 127 outstanding applications because “they required the proponent to demonstrate development consent, submission of surveys or other approvals”. That so many mines remain on that list is disturbing. That some are having trouble providing development consent is even more so.

The“Condition Mapping Project” was launched in October, 2017 when the Ridgelands case proved NSW Government departments tasked with regulating 5000 mining and exploration titles did not even have a consolidated register of the conditions. That is an alarming statement in the digital age, andcoming long after an historic mining boom has peaked.

Issue: 39,063.

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Klemmer final piece for Knights: Watson

Kangaroos and Canterbury prop David Klemmer could be on his way to Newcastle by the weekend.The likely addition of David Klemmer will be the final piece of the Newcastle rebuild into a top-eight NRL contender, according to playmaker Connor Watson.
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Talks on Canterbury’s release of Klemmer is expected to ramp up towards the end of this week, allowing him to take up a lucrative deal at the Knights.

And according to Watson and star teammate Kalyn Ponga, the addition of the incumbent Kangaroos prop should instantly make the Knights a finals team.

Klemmer could form an all-State of Origin front-row pairing with fellow new recruit Tim Glasby as destructive as any in the league.

Throw in another new face in James Gavet, in addition to Jacob and Daniel Saifiti, and lock Mitch Barnett, and the Knights’ group of middle men is suddenly deep.

“We’ll have two State of Origin front-rowers there,” Watson said.

“It’s been a bit tough for the guys here because people that have been playing front-row were in their first and second year.

“That’s only going to help them boys go even more, and the fact they’ve been blooded for those couple of seasons is only going to give them more experience.

“We’ll have a really good, experienced forward pack who’s played a lot of first grade footy.”

The new-look engine room could provide plenty of space for the likes of Ponga, who is slated for a career-changing switch into the halves.

Watson expects to train at fullback once both players return from their respective off-season surgeries in the coming weeks.

“I think the young forwards that were there last year will definitely learn off (Klemmer) and he’ll provide a good platform for us,” Ponga said.

“His momentum will be awesome. I heard he’s a really good bloke as well, which is fitting for our club, that’s what we want. It’d be pretty exciting if we get him.”

The Knights haven’t tasted finals since 2013 and only ended an unwanted streak of three consecutive wooden spoons this year.

But with a revamped roster at his disposal – former Cronulla centre Jesse Ramien is also on board – a top-eight spot is expected.

“I think everyone goes into the season with expectations to make the top eight. But I feel like this year, we should really do it,” Watson said.

“If we’re not kidding ourselves, we are a top eight side.”

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All the V8 action, photos, updates from the crowd at the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018

Relive all the action, photos, moments from the Newcastle 500 Supercars Photo: Jonathan Carroll
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Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Picture shows Scott McLaughlin supporters.

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

Picture: City of Newcastle

Picture: City of Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

SUPERCARS: Newcastle 500. Picture: City of Newcastle

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

Picture: Shell V-Power Racing Team

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

Wayne Peacock of Maitland and his grandson Charlie Parker, 6, watching V8 Supercars practice session 1 on day 1 of the Newcastle 500 V8 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

Newcastle Beach on day 1 of the Newcastle 500 V8 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018.

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018.

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Little Oliver Anderson with his father Chris Anderson. Picture: Phoebe Moloney

A bit of Newy pride trackside at the Newcastle 500 this morning. Photo: Josh Callinan

Warm and windy conditions on the walk to the race precinct earlier Friday morning. Photo: Josh Callinan

Early punters getting to the good spots trackside at the Newcastle 500. Photo: Josh Callinan

Chelsea & Logan Marshall. Picture: Max McKinney

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture:Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture:Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

V8: Day 1 of the Newcastle 500 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Trevor Davis of Raymond Terrace shows the ear plugs his guide dog Josie is wearing, on day 1 of the Newcastle 500 V8 Supercars 2018. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY1: Newcastle 500 Supercars. Picture: City of Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Newcastle 500. Picture: City of Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Newcastle 500. Picture: City of Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Newcastle 500. Picture: City of Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Newcastle 500. Picture: City of Newcastle

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY TWO: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

SUPERCARS: Day three of the Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

Picture: City of Newcastle

Picture: City of Newcastle

Picture: City of Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

DAY THREE: Newcastle 500. Picture: Media Response Newcastle

TweetFacebookRELIVE ALL THE BIG MOMENTS HERE:Here’s what we know so far:

All the photos of the supercars rolling into Newcastle.Take a sneaky look at the yachts lining Newcastle HarbourOur complete guide to theNewcastle Supercars 2018The secret bar for Newcastle supercar fans with a beachside viewSee the Full track resultsMeet the Supercars driversTake a look atall the action here:

Were you at the Supercars? Send your photos and videosto [email protected]苏州夜总会招聘.au, or tag us on social media @NewcastleHerald to have your Supercars photos featured on our website.

Read more about the Newcastle 500:

‘Underground secret’: Trackside venueriding the wavesof SupercarsWatch: Supercars roll into Newcastle ready for weekend of racing‘Mini-Monaco’: Newcastle Harbour to be lined with boats during Supercars

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Rugby needs to evolve, says Force skipper

Western Force captain Ian Prior is enthused about Global Rapid Rugby’s introduction in 2019.Evolve now or fizzle out.
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That’s the thinking behind Andrew Forrest’s Global Rapid Rugby, and Western Force skipper Ian Prior predicts it will become rugby’s version of Twenty20 cricket.

Forrest will launch his new competition in either late February or early March, with the proposed rule changes set to encourage a more free-flowing, exciting brand of rugby.

One of the new rule changes that excites Prior the most is the chance to pull off a rugby league-style 40-20 kick.

Nine-point Power Tries, rolling substitutions, and no direct kicks for touch from inside the defensive 22m will also add to the spectacle.

Prior, who stuck with the Force after it was axed from Super Rugby at the end of 2017, believes rugby needs to change to keep up with the times.

“Certain aspects of the game were probably a bit stale,” Prior said.

“Challenging the norm has been a big point (of this new competition). We want to play a high octane brand of rugby.

“When Twenty20 came about in cricket, everyone was hesitant about that. I’m a Test cricket fan myself, so I was also hesitant about Twenty20.

“But now it’s the biggest product they probably have, the biggest revenue driver.

“If you don’t evolve, your sport can fizzle out. It’s a pretty competitive sporting landscape in , so you’ve got to keep evolving.”

Forrest, who has an estimated worth of $4.4 billion, is hopeful of attracting 20 of the world’s top 100 rugby players to Global Rapid Rugby.

Marquee players will be spread across the eight franchises.

Forrest is confident the new competition will be a success, but the critics aren’t so sure.

Prior said the success of World Series Rugby this year – when the Force played seven exhibition games in front of big crowds – proved there was a hunger for something new.

“”We proved people wrong this year with World Series Rugby,” Prior said.

“They said it wouldn’t work, we wouldn’t get crowds, and we proved them wrong by having the highest representation per week in crowds.

“We’ve got new, innovative countries who want to grow the game.

“I guess with change there’s always a little bit of nervousness from other people that are outside the bubble. But being part of it is very exciting.”

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Melbourne surgeon punch killer guilty

As surgeon Patrick Pritzwald-Stegmann lay convulsing on the ground outside the Melbourne hospital where he worked, the man who punched him ran away.
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Joseph Esmaili, 24, was on Wednesday found guilty of manslaughter with a Supreme Court jury disregarding excuses he struck the blow in self defence.

The 41-year-old doctor was leaving Box Hill Hospital in May last year, heading home to his wife and children, when he stopped to tell a group including Esmaili to stop smoking near the front entrance.

An argument ensued, ending with the punch.

“I wasn’t trying to hit him hard. I shouldn’t have hit him in the first place,” Esmaili told police during an interview recounted by prosecutors in court.

Esmaili said he felt pressured by the surgeon.

During a four-week trial the jury heard from witnesses who recounted the pair arguing and the subsequent sound of the punch and the sickening thud as the surgeon hit the floor.

“I saw and heard the noise of a tenpin bowling ball hitting the floor,” one man told the jury.

Esmaili fled while staff from the hospital rushed to help their colleague.

Some were brought to tears when recounting evidence in front of Justice Elizabeth Hollingworth.

Nurse Jessica Bourke ran for help after viewing the scene through a window from a nearby stairwell

“I know he was punched and I ran up the stairs to get help,” she said.

Mr Pritzwald-Stegmann’s life support was terminated about a month later.

Defence lawyer John Desmond argued its withdrawal led to the surgeon’s death, rather than the single punch.

He argued Esmaili had also felt threatened by the doctor who repeatedly pursued him after the initial argument and reacted in self-defence.

“My client is retreating,” Mr Desmond said referring to CCTV footage.

“It’s the doctor who continues to pursue. He puts down his bag. He’s up for it.”

Chief prosecutor Brendan Kissane QC argued the doctor would have ultimately died from the seriousness of his injuries.

Mr Pritzwald-Stegmann suffered bilateral skull fractures and was seen bleeding from the nose and mouth after the attack.

Esmaili will be sentenced at a later date.

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De Minaur’s rise inspires Gavrilova

Daria Gavrilova wants to follow the lead of Alex de Minaur and excel at the Brisbane International.Watching Alex de Minaur’s stunning rise has inspired fellow n Daria Gavrilova to use the 2019 Brisbane International as a springboard to grand slam success next year.
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World No.36 Gavrilova has confirmed she will contest next month’s Brisbane tournament for the first time in three years, completing a stellar women’s field that includes seven of the world’s top 10 players.

The former US Open girls champion said she wanted to test herself against the best in Brisbane in a bid to spark 2019 momentum just like de Minaur did this year.

The 19-year-old de Minaur stunned the 2018 Brisbane International field, reaching the semi-finals and a week later made the final four at Sydney.

It kick-started a breakout season in which the plucky teenager started 2018 at No.201 and finished as ‘s top ranked male player at 31, earning ATP World Tour’s Newcomer of the Year honours.

Gavrilova, 24, needed inspiration after dropping out of the world top 30 in 2018, ensuring she can not rely on grand slam seedings for the first time in years.

And she reckons she found it watching de Minaur channel Lleyton Hewitt this year.

“Last year I was watching de Minaur a lot (in Brisbane) and everyone was supporting him – I just can’t wait to start the season,” Gavrilova said in Brisbane.

“For sure I want to start my season on a high.

“I want to challenge myself against top players, that’s why I have entered this tournament.

“My biggest goal for next year is to play the bigger tournaments, play against top players.”

Gavrilova had a solid year, reaching the third round in the French Open and at Wimbledon with second round exits at the n and US Opens.

“My goal this year was to make the second week of a slam but it hasn’t happened,” she said.

“I would love to make a second week as soon as possible, hopefully in Melbourne (n Open) it is going to happen.”

Gavrilova will join de Minaur as part of a six-strong n contingent at the Brisbane International also including Nick Kyrgios, John Millman and Sam Stosur.

The women’s field will be headed by world No.4 Elina Svitolina and reigning US Open champion Naomi Osaka.

Andy Murray, Rafael Nadal and Kei Nishikori headline the men’s field for the tournament starting on December 30.

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Former CBA chair refused to repay fees

Former CBA chairman David Turner (R) refused to return any of his fees when asked by the board.The Commonwealth Bank’s former chairman refused to return some of his hundreds of thousands in pay after a damning inquiry into ‘s biggest bank, his replacement says.
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After years of only cutting executives’ million-dollar bonuses after scandals became public, CBA’s board itself took a 20 per cent cut in fees after APRA’s scathing prudential inquiry.

The board asked former chairman David Turner to return 40 per cent of the fees he earned in his final year at CBA, the banking royal commission heard on Wednesday.

Current chairwoman Catherine Livingstone said the board thought it would be appropriate.

“The board felt that it was appropriate as chair that he also effectively participate in the reduction that we had all taken for effectively what was described in the APRA report,” she said.

But Mr Turner did not agree to return any of his fees, she said.

“He communicated that, and I’m paraphrasing here because I obviously didn’t have the direct conversation, that he didn’t recognise in the APRA report the CBA board that he knew.”

The banking regulator in May was scathing of CBA for being complacent and blinded to threats in its business as profits rolled in, while also criticising inadequate oversight and challenge by the board.

Mr Turner retired at the end of 2016.

He was paid $437,521 for the six months of the 2017 financial year that he worked, compared to $874,521 for the previous year.

The royal commission heard that for years CBA failed to cut executives’ million-dollar bonuses despite a long list of scandals and problems.

CBA executives missed out on bonuses in 2016/17, on the back of AUSTRAC’s anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing case against the bank.

Ms Livingstone said some of the group executives immediately accepted the decision but others were upset.

“Some were angry and others felt that because it had affected the whole group, including people who hadn’t been there for very long, that it wasn’t fair.

“But the point of the board taking this view was to emphasise the importance of collective accountability.”

CBA, which paid a $700 million civil penalty to settle the AUSTRAC action, has made changes to its remuneration practices.

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Newcastle District Cricket Association: Mitch on the case in Hamilton-Wickham’s pace attack

BOWLER: Mitch Casey has returned for Hamilton-Wickham this summer despite a lifetime of injuries on and off the sporting field. Picture: Max Mason-HubersMitch Casey has broken his nose nine times.
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He also has five metal plates in his head, most recently broke his ankle and once fractured his skull.

But a lifetime of injuries, suffered on and off the sporting field, hasn’t stopped the 36-year-old returning tocricketthis summer with Hamilton-Wickham.

And the recently married plumber, who lives in Newcastle, has relished the chance to be back in the middle by claiming seven wickets from six games.

“I’ve really enjoyed playing again and I’ve been bowling pretty well,” the right-arm paceman said.

Casey, the brother-in-law of former NRL player and now Huddersfield coach Simon Woolford,was born and raised in Young and arrived in Newcastle around sixyears ago via Canberra.

His first introduction to cricket in the Hunter region was with Merewether in the Newcastle City and Suburban competition, includingfigures of 4-37winning the A-grade grand final in 2012-13.

His most recent return to the sport last season featured a second premiership in the same competition, but this time with the Cricketers Arms Hotel taking 14 wickets in just a handful of appearances late in the piece.

In between times, outside plenty of rugby league with Western Suburbs, Caseylinked with Hamwicksfor one campaignin 2014-2015.

Most notably, besides a Tom Locker Cup one-day title and a semi-final showing in the district first-grade ranks, was playing in the NSW Country Cup decider at the SCG.

“It was unreal,” he said.

“I’d been lucky enough to play at Manuka [in Canberra] for a few rep things, but that [SCG] was something else.”

The Pumas went down to Merewether by just 10 runs that day almost four years ago.

Casey has now reconnected with many of those same teammates at Hamwickssuch as fellow bowler Tom Dwyer, injured batsman Rhys Hanlon and the Webber twins, Sam and Matt.

“A lot of theguys from that team are still around,” Casey said.

Hamwicks have only dropped the one match so far in 2018-19, last start against defending champions Wests, and sit in a four-way share of third on the overall standings.

“I think we can give it a fair crack,” Casey said.

“As long aswe can get out batting together, our bowling is good enough.”

In the meantime, the Pumas are chasing outright points against City at Passmore Oval. The hosts are 86 runs ahead with nine wickets in hand and 90 overs to play this Saturday.

Caseyalso hasa chance to collect a second Tom Locker crown when Hamwicksmeet Universityin the 40-over showdown at No1 Sportsground on December 9.

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Humpback whales change their songs

Research shows male humpback whale groups change their anthem songs over the years.Populations of male humpback whales undergo a “cultural revolution” every few years when they change their song anthem, research has shown.
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A study of whale song patterns spanning 13 years found that the signature song of individual groups evolves gradually over time.

But every few years, a population’s song is completely replaced in an event described as a “cultural revolution”.

When the revolutions occur, the new song is always simpler than the one that preceded it.

Humpback whales are famed for having “dialects” unique to different populations. In addition, groups of male whales have their own “anthems”, with each member of the population singing the same sequence of the same sounds.

The new research, which focused on 95 humpback whale “singers” from east , found evidence that gradual song changes are due to embellishments introduced by individuals that are then learned by the rest of the group.

Songs introduced by revolutions may be simpler because the singers find it harder to learn completely new material, say the scientists.

Lead researcher Dr Jenny Allen, from the University of Queensland, , said: “We examined two measures of song structure, complexity and entropy (a tendency to become more disordered) in the eastern n population over 13 consecutive years.

“Complexity increased as songs evolved over time, but decreased when revolutions occurred.

“No correlation between complexity and entropy estimates suggests that changes to complexity may represent embellishment to the song which could allow males to stand out amidst population-wide conformity.

“The consistent reduction in complexity during song revolutions suggests a potential limit to the social learning capacity of novel material in humpback whales.”

The research, which also involved UK scientists at the University of St Andrews, is reported in the journal Royal Society Proceedings B.

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